Kindness Still Exists – Especially in the Plant World

A few weeks ago I received a letter in the mail addressed to “Person with Beautiful Flowers”. I won’t rewrite it here, but what I can tell you is it was one of the kindest gestures I’ve ever experienced. A sweet woman, that I’ve never met in my life, sent me a letter telling me that she purposefully drove past my house to see my flowers.

I know she must be a plant person because only another plant lover would appreciate the effort and dedication it takes to keep annual flowers looking good for the entire growing season.

And they were glorious, my friends. Non-stop beautiful colors that just kept spilling further down the front of our porch.

I have three hayrack planters across our front porch.

That kindness really meant a lot. After all, we do plant flowers to bring beauty to our homes; for everyone who sees our homes to appreciate. So I guess that’s mission accomplished.

Today is the day that I’m finally going to remove my flowers. Honestly, they are still looking pretty good. But it’s been a long season and they are reaching their limit. I don’t want to leave them out looking tired and stressed. It will be sad and the front of our house will certainly look pretty bare without them.

Now I get to plan what plants I will use next year (I’m actually grinning like a crazy person at the thought.)

Our house sits really close to a busy intersection with a stop sign right in front. So I felt like my flowers should be looking good for the whole season.
This soft colors combination of petunias and million bells was my favorite.

Would you be interested to know what steps I took to keep my flowers looking great all season? Would you like to know which flowers I used? Comment and let me know!

Mercy, peace and love be multiplied to you.

Rhaphidophora or Cebu Blue Pothos???

This past summer, in the plant world, there was this whole thing about how a mature form Cebu Blue Pothos plant looks shockingly similar to a Rhaphidophora tetrasperma. And because Rhaphis are so sought after, it was inevitable that plant shops would start selling Cebu Blue Pothos (in mature form) as Rhaphis.

Of course, my question is, “Honest mistake or straight deceit?”

So that brings me to my own experience with this question. I just this week received a plant labeled as a Rhaphidophora. Only I’m having some serious doubts as to its authenticity as a Rhaphi. And I wish that the answer was an easy one. Unfortunately for me, Rhaphis belong to the Aroid family, many members of which take drastically different forms as juvenile plants as compared to their mature plant form.

You may know from my previous blog that I already own a Rhaphidophora. I bought this new one from a different online plant shop. And they do not look like each other. At all…

They have differently colored leaves; one blueish and one a much deeper green. The new plant has longer, narrower leaves. The OG plant has heart shaped leaves with deep fenestrations. Could this just be the difference between a juvenile and mature form of the same plant?

Yes. The answer is yes.

But could this also be two completely different genera of plants?

Yes. The answer is yes. (Insert several minutes here for me to bang my head against the wall.) Yes, the two plants (mature form Cebu Blue Pothos and Rhaphidophora) look remarkably similar. The really super unfortunate thing is that I have paid a lot of money (for me) for both of these plants. And the thought of some devious vendor selling me a Pothos plant, even a Cebu Blue Pothos plant, at a Rhaphidophora tetrasperma price makes my blood boil.

So, my friends, I’d love to have your help and input with this issue! I’ve included a link to a video I posted earlier today on my YouTube that shows both of the plants so you can see them together. Help me! Please!

Thanks in advance for your help!

Mercy, peace and love be multiplied to you.

Rhaphidophora tetrasperma – My Unicorn Plant

Do you have one? A unicorn plant? Mine is the lovely Rhaphidophora tetrasperma. It’s the stuff of dreams. No, I literally have dreams about this plant. I could spend half of my day in my favorite planty corner of the house and just stroke its smooth leaves.

Am I being inappropriate?

I bet you have a plant like that in your collection. Or maybe, you have a plant that you are desperately wanting but cannot find. That was my Rhaphidophora for me.

I blame Instagram. That’s where I started seeing this unicorn in my feed and decided that I must own one. But try to find one for sale. It ain’t too easy, my friend. It seemed like every time I’d find a Rhaph for sale, it would be marked as sold out. Or it was from a vendor that was outside of the United States. Knowing that this plant is notoriously bad at shipping and pretty pricey as well, I wasn’t willing to risk it. So I went for the next year and a half searching the internet high and low, with zero success. Nothing. For a year and a half. I figured that I’d never be able to check this plant off my list.

Even worse was when I started buying from disreputable Etsy vendors out of pure desperation. I figured I’d try anyway. Talk about heart-break. When I finally started getting plants in the mail they were either completely rotted or had lost all of their leaves. So I obviously attempted to grow out stem cuttings only to experience further heartbreak when the cuttings all slowly rotted and died.

But don’t despair, friends! I did get a Rhaph not too long ago from a reputable plant seller and, so far, it is still living!!!

My (still living) Rhaphidophora tetrasperma!!!

And don’t think that this plant didn’t struggle as well because she did. I unboxed her to find yellowing patches on the leaves and my heart sank straight into my shoes. I’ve had to treat the leaves with a gentle Hydrogen peroxide solution (several times) and I broke my “I never repot my plants until they are properly acclimated” rule on day number 2. But it’s been several weeks and things seem to be going well. Fingers crossed!

Feel free to comment below if you have had a terrible time finding a plant or just keeping it alive after rough shipping circumstances. I’d love to commiserate with you!

Mercy, peace and love be multiplied to you.

The Best Potting Mix for a Peace Lily

As soon as people find out that I sell houseplants, I am usually asked the same handful of questions. One of those questions is almost always, “Can you help me save my Peace Lily?” (Or something along those lines.) So I figured I’d start my plant blogging journey with some help for all those Peace Lily parents out there. And since one of the most frequent questions I get about Peace Lilies is, “What type of soil should I use for my Peace Lily?” I figure that’s a great place to start. (Head to the very bottom of this article for the simple percentages of this potting mix recipe.)

One of the most important things to know about Spathiphyllum (that’s the scientific name of a Peace Lily) is that their root systems are very sensitive and can be burned by any potting mixes that have fertilizer already mixed in them. Now, I’m not saying that your plant will die if you use these types of potting mixes. They most likely won’t. But I will tell you that they will not be very happy and you will be running the risk of root damage and all the bad things that can follow. I don’t want your plant to be unhappy and most likely, you don’t either!

So let’s get to the recipe! You will need Coco Coir, Perlite, horticultural/Orchid Bark, horticultural Charcoal and Worm Castings. Yum! (I don’t know why, but as I typed the word “recipe” and then the words “Worm Castings” I just got this gag reflex thing going. Teehee.) I will include an affiliate link with each of these items in case you are interested in the specific brands that I use.

Begin with the Coco Coir. If you buy this in a block or brick, you will need to add water. It’s really cool like a science experiment! The Coir will absorb a LOT of water. Start with a small amount and you can add more as needed. The Coir will equal about 50% of the potting mix.

Next is the Perlite. This is an important step because the perlite will help prevent the coir from compacting around the roots of your plant. I generally add about 25% perlite. Is this an exact science? No. In fact I feel a little like a mad scientist when I am stirring up my potting mixes.

Orchid Bark comes next at about 15% of the mix. As you can assume from its name, orchid bark is used as a potting medium for orchids. We will be using it to add even more oxygen to the root zone of our Peace Lily. The bark pieces will trap oxygen near the root zone, they will prevent the potting mix from compacting around the roots and will also provide nutrients to the soil as the pieces of bark begin to break down.

Almost done! Next we will add approx. 5% horticultural Charcoal. Yes, it is important to use a charcoal product that is listed as horticultural. I add charcoal to my potting mixes when I know that the soil will be kept pretty moist. Charcoal works to remove impurities from the potting mix and also keeps it from smelling yucky.

Last, we will add in the Worm Castings at 5%. (In case you were wondering, worm castings is a nice way to say worm poopy.) Remember back in the first paragraph when I told you that Peace Lilies have roots that are sensitive to fertilizers? Well, worm castings are a gentle, yet effective way to give your plant a boost of nutrients. Also, I have found that some people are strongly opposed to using worm castings because they are essentially an animal byproduct. If you feel strongly against using worm castings, just leave that ingredient out of your potting mix. And yes, your potting mix recipe will only equal 95%.

Mix these ingredients well and you are all set to repot your beloved Peace Lily. If you would like to see this in a video format, click the link and it will take you to my YouTube video.

If you have read through this recipe and don’t feel like you can do this mix, let me recommend a potting mix that you can purchase ready-made. (Even though this potting mix is a really good one, I would still add more perlite. But that’s entirely up to you.) The Fox Farms Bush Doctor Coco Loco potting mix is a great choice. It uses coco coir as its base and not peat moss which is very important in my opinion.

I am aware that many of you who are looking for care tips for a Peace Lily are doing so because you have received this plant upon the death of a loved one. I want you to know that I take that knowledge very seriously, my friends! I do understand what a plant can do for someone who has lost a beloved family member or friend. I have used this mix for the last two years on my own plants with great success. I wish you all the best with your plant!

Mercy, peace and love be multiplied to you.

Products I use and (therefore) recommend:

Planty friends – Feel free to use these links to the products that I use for my houseplants.  I receive a small percentage of any sales through these links, so feel free not to use them if that bothers you.

Horticultural 1/4” pumice – https://amzn.to/2KfcNPT

Horticultural perlite – https://amzn.to/3f9wwvE

Coco coir – https://amzn.to/2UBBiZF

Orchid Bark – Extra small chips – https://amzn.to/38OXWWJ

Orchid Bark – Small chips – https://amzn.to/3kA8HOU

Earthworm castings – https://amzn.to/38TRkGw

Coco Loco potting mix – https://amzn.to/2UHV3OY

GE Balanced Spectrum grow light bulb – https://amzn.to/3fdeAAu

Monios L LED grow lights – 2 ft. – https://amzn.to/391NmeS

Bonsai scissors – https://amzn.to/33a6F29

Hygrometer (humidity monitor) – https://amzn.to/32WtiqO

Moisture meter sticks – https://amzn.to/35FR7Vk

Horticultural charcoal – https://amzn.to/2UKOv25

Organic houseplant fertilizer liquid – https://amzn.to/3pIb7ij

Insecticide/Miticide – (many bug sprays don’t kill spider mites, this one does) – https://amzn.to/3pHKREw

Systemic houseplant insecticide – https://amzn.to/36MuoX8

Full disclosure – the last three product links will be much cheaper if you can find them in your local garden center.  I’ve put them here so that you can see what they are called and what they look like, but I’d advise that you buy from these links only as a last resort.

Potting Mix for a Peace Lily Recipe

Yeah…I’ve Killed That Before

Rest in Peace, my poor baby.

I’m not exaggerating, my friends. I’ve killed hundreds of plants. Maybe even thousands. I realize that I sound heartless when I say this, but I’m gonna say it anyway. Killing plants is a great way to learn how to keep plants alive. No, seriously! When I lose a plant it gives me a chance to reflect on how and when things went sideways. Did I overwater? Did I underwater? Was there evidence of pests and/or disease? After I puzzle out the plant’s (most likely) cause of death, I give myself permission to try again. So if I see that same plant in a garden center, I don’t feel animosity towards it. We’re still friends. And I will try again. Also, for the record, I am not encouraging plant violence with this advice. Instead, I am trying to encourage those who have killed a plant (or many plants) to just keep trying. Don’t let plant failures make you afraid to purchase that next beautiful plant.

Now it’s time for the confessional section of this pep talk. The part where I tell you what plant/plants I have murdered most recently. I’ll be honest, this one really hurts. Just today I gave up on one of my top ten most favorite plants. It was once a gorgeous Calathea musaica (pictured above) but what I threw into the trash can this morning was really just three yellow leaves poking out of a pot of dirt. I gave it weeks of gentle care, searching for signs of insect pest damage, Neem oil sprays, Hydrogen Peroxide treatments and a soil change. But all of my care came to nothing because my beloved little plant, my sweet and beautiful musaica, died. One unfortunate side-effect of plant murder is some pretty intense plant shame. A lot of that shame is probably due to the fact that a few months ago I was blowing up Instagram with pictures of my pretty little Calathea and advising others that it was an easy houseplant.

Friends, realize that all those Instagram pictures of perfect specimen plants are cropped and edited and Photoshopped to look that way. No plant is perfect and guess what? We plant parents aren’t perfect either. So the next time you are tempted by a beautiful plant in the garden center, don’t let it fill you with anxiety and guilt. Do your research and give it the best care you are capable of giving.

Mercy, peace and love be multiplied to you.